Poul Anderson

Review: Paradox, edited by Ian Whates

Paradox, edited by Ian Whates and published by Newcon Press, is a collection of new stories exploring aspects of the Fermi Paradox. It features stories by Rachel Armstrong, Keith Brooke & Eric Brown, Pat Cadigan, David L. Clements, Paul Cornell, Paul di Filippo, Robert Reed, Mike Resnick & Robert T. Jeschoenek, Mercurio D Rivera, Adam Roberts, Stephanie Saulter, Tricia Sullivan, Adrian Tchaikovsky, Gerry Webb and George Zebrowski.

SOME OF THE BEST YA SF EVER: The “Winston Juveniles”—Part One

Back in the Good Old (or Bad, depends on your point of view) Days, fiction—especially SF—that was written for a teen audience was called “Juvenile” fiction; I don’t believe any disparagement was meant, or at least we juveniles (except for the “delinquents”) never took it as disparaging. Nowadays teens are called “Young Adults,” and fiction […]

Fan Fotos

Fotos of Worldcons Past. A photo gallery by Fred A. Levy Haskell of Saint Louiscon, the 27th Worldcon.

Analog_1978

Hugo by the Numbers Part 2

Let this serve as your reminder that final ballots for the 2013 Hugo Awards are due today. (07/31/13) With that in mind, I bring you my continued parade of Hugo Award statistics from across the years. This latest installment includes statistics from the other three fiction categories: Best Short Story, Best Novelette, and Best Novella. […]

Sword & Planet

Discussions of what is and what is not Sword & Sorcery can be a thorny proposition. On the one hand S&S is largely no different than epic Fantasy (ala Tolkien) except in scope or tone. On the other side is a branch of Science Fantasy known as Sword & Planet, and to many is called […]

POUL ANDERSON: THE INVISIBLE CLASSIC

Sometimes great books come and go, waiting for another chance to be discovered and given the place on our bookshelves they truly deserve. Sword & Sorcery is no exception. In 1951, Poul Anderson wrote what was a labor of love, a Fantasy based on the mythology of his ancestors, the Scandinavians. The book was called […]

JACK VANCE: VISIONS OF A DYING EARTH

After the last few S&S works of the early 1940s, such as “Dragon Moon” by Henry Kuttner and the short-lived Unknown, Sword & Sorcery lost steam. With Robert E. Howard dead for five or more years, Heroic Fantasy became a thing of the past with only the occasional Edmond Hamilton Weird Tales fantasy or anomalies […]