What if your TV shows were way, way smarter? Enter CuriosityStream.

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  • CuriosityStream offers a streaming library of over 2,000 documentary features and series.
  • The service was created by Discovery Channel, TLC and Animal Planet founder John S. Hendricks.
  • CuriosityStream is available anywhere with no international geo-locking restrictions.

With new Apple and Disney streaming services dropping earlier this month, there have never been more high quality streaming options available. Programs like “The Morning Show” or “The Mandalorian” are undoubtedly fun, but are those shows offering anything beyond simple entertainment?

CuriosityStream is a nonfiction streaming platform that wants you to actually learn something while you watch, giving you access to their vast digital library of over 2,000 documentary features and series that open up every facet of our planet, our times and our universe.

The brainchild of Discovery Channel, TLC and Animal Planet founder John S. Hendricks, the service offers their archive of high quality films and original series on demand. If it’s science and nature, history, technology, or rooted in world societies or lifestyles, it’s likely you’ll already find it on CuriosityStream.

Their reservoir of content includes a huge collection of prestige BBC and other international documentaries. You’ll also find original series and films featuring some of the world’s most renowned figures like David Attenborough and Stephen Hawking.

CuriosityStream is also available worldwide and can be watched on virtually any TV, desktop PC, tablet or mobile device.

Buy now: A three-year subscription to CuriosityStream is available now with an additional $5 price drop, down to just $40, a $20 savings. You can also sample the service with a two-year plan for $25.

Prices are subject to change.

 

CuriosityStream: 3-Yr Subscription – $40

Get educated for $40

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This article was originally posted on Big Think

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