Henry Kuttner

Interview with SFWA Grand Master Robert Silverberg

Today we are joined by Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) Grand Master Robert Silverberg. Mr. Silverberg writes speculative fiction that travels where he wants it to go, pushing aside the traditional limitations with which many writers confine themselves. He has written countless novels and works of short fiction, and his list of non-fiction books is staggering. Mr. Silverberg has been so prolific that his total word count rivals the quantity of stars in the galaxy.

JACK VANCE: VISIONS OF A DYING EARTH

After the last few S&S works of the early 1940s, such as “Dragon Moon” by Henry Kuttner and the short-lived Unknown, Sword & Sorcery lost steam. With Robert E. Howard dead for five or more years, Heroic Fantasy became a thing of the past with only the occasional Edmond Hamilton Weird Tales fantasy or anomalies […]

Discovering Planet Stories

As a fan of the classic Science Fiction and Fantasy pulp magazines (exemplified by my thrill to be involved here at Amazing Stories), I find myself a bit giddy whenever I stumble upon an old edition. But as the value of these (both collectable AND literary) increases over time, getting your hands on one you […]

FRITZ LEIBER: SWORD & SORCERY GROWS UP

In 1939 Farnsworth Wright began a move away from Sword & Sorcery. With Robert E. Howard dead, he no longer championed the dark fantasy tale, publishing Henry Kuttner’s Elak as the last. This meant that Fritz Leiber, who had written horror stories for Weird Tales, was not welcome with his new series, this featuring two […]

BLUE PENCILS AND BLOODY SWORDS: EDITORS OF S&S

It’s easy to discuss authors for their contributions are evident. You just have to read the stories. The great editors are harder to corral, for the editor’s job is one of selection, guidance, subjective acts that may be hard to understand in hindsight. (For instance, all those men and women who rejected Dune by Frank […]

Jirel of Joiry: Sword & Sorcery’s First Lady

Circumstance plays a part in history. It was inevitable that a woman would eventually try her hand at Sword & Sorcery. It’s our good fortune that C. L. Moore was writing for Weird Tales in the 1930s. Leigh Brackett would have been the next logical choice, but she didn’t rise to prominence until the 1950s, […]

Demolition

I was going to devote this initial essay to The Shaver Mystery, that forties phenomenon masterminded by Raymond Palmer which put science fiction for the first time (and not in an helpful fashion) under the lens of Henry Luce and Time but have decided to take a pass.  Wikipedia has already entirely reconfigured the culture. […]