The 1941 Retro Hugo Awards (Part 2 – The Authors)

Every single author writing professionally in the field in 1940.

Corrections 9/15/15:  wow.  Not only did I get the date on Weinbaum’s story wrong (it was published in 1936 and thus ineligible), but I got the title wrong – it ought to have been The Valley of Dreams.  Sometimes enthusiasm runs ahead of the facts and this was one of those times.  However, allow me to apologize by reiterating that everything published in 1940 may not be eligible for a Hugo and that individual stories will have to be checked by the nominators themselves.

Part 1 (Editors & Publications) can be found here

In this installment, we take a look at the authors.

1939 through 1941 saw the science fiction business booming.  Markets had nearly quadrupled and many new authors who had cut their teeth reading Weird Tales, Amazing Stories, Astounding Stories of Super Science and Wonder Stories were beginning to find their feet.  Campbell was in stride, developing a host of new authors who were encouraged to meet his standards for scientific and technological accuracy and in building future worlds that made sense (thought experiments).  The fans had taken control of the front office (the back office, the side office and the office no one talks about, as well) and created a conduit that moved many from fan activity to Pro-dom.

A new era was dawning, call it science fiction’s early adolescence.  It would set the tone for a few decades to come.

Notable among the authors writing in 1940 are quite a few recognizable names:

Asimov, Bester, Blish, Bloch, Brackett, Cummings, de Camp, del Rey, Derleth, Eshbach, Farley, Fearn, Gallun, Hamilton, Heinlein, Hubbard, Kornbluth, Kuttner, Lieber, Lovecraft, Moore, Pohl, Russell, Simak, Smith, Sturgeon, Temple, van Vogt, Weinbaum, Wilcox, Williamson, Wollheim.

Notably missing from that list of notables are Clarke and Bradbury…

There are quite a few names from the previous couple of decades present as well: Bates, Binder, Bond, Breuer, Coblentz, Fyfe, Jameson, Kaletsky, Keller, Long, Lowndes, Manning, Olson, Phillips, Pratt, Quinn, Rocklynne, Shurtleff, Vincent, Williams.

Now here I’ll delve into a bit of partisanship and mention that this will be the last opportunity we have to recognize the contributions of certain individuals through the Hugo Awards.  I’d not even go this far in making suggestions if I weren’t sure that the authors I’m going to mention are almost universally recognized as having made enormous contributions to the field:

Stanley G. Weinbaum’s The Lotus Eaters is not the man’s best work – but it is pretty good and is also the sequel to the story that single-handedly changed the face of science fiction – A Martian Odyssey.  He’s not yet been inducted into SF’s Hall of Fame, has never received an award (though Startling Stories did reprint his novel The Black Flame in their “SF Hall of Fame” feature in 1939), can never become a SFWA Grand Master (rules) and yet his work can arguably be considered the direct progenitor of all modern science fiction. (Martian Odyssey is, btw, one of the most reprinted short stories in the history of the genre.)

Likewise, the final installment of The Grey Lensman may be a bit of thin ice on which to base a nomination, but not so thin are the contributions of one Edward E. ‘Doc’ Smith Ph.D., the author who, along with Edmond Hamilton and John Campbell moved SF out of the solar system and into the cosmos on the grandest of all scales.  Smith’s Skylark of Space is recognized as being the first Space Opera, while his Lensman series represents a maturing of form and has gone on to influence such broadly popular works as The Green Lantern and it’s themes are found, in one form or another, in virtually every space opera that has since been written.

Then there’s Don Wilcox, whose The Voyage That Lasted 600 Years (reprinted in our 88th anniversary issue and readable here) represents the first generation ship story, told from a viewpoint unique among such tales.  (And it doesn’t hurt that it originally appeared in Amazing Stories either.)

At first blush, a few other works stand out – van Vogt’s Slan, serialized in Astounding (how can we not nominate the novel that gives meaning to the expression Fans Are Slans!?) and Heinlein’s Requiem (THE story that exemplifies science fiction’s yearning for space).

As I personally work through the list of stories available (and turn to my collection of ‘zines and anthologies to re-read them) I’m sure I will find other authors and stories worthy of attention.

***

What follows is a complete list of every single author who published during 1940.  They are listed in alphabetical order by last name.  The number of works they published during the eligibility period and any pseudonyms they may have used are included as well.

Please note a few things:  The number of entries for each author includes collaborations and counts each installment of a serial as a single entry.  Both authors of collaborative efforts have individual entries and the collaboration counts as an entry for each author.

This information was gathered from the Internet Speculative Fiction Data Base (a fine and excellent resource!) and then re-formatted for our purposes here.  Some items were checked with secondary sources.  This data may not be entirely exhaustive for the year (it does not, for example, include any fiction published in the fanzines or semi-professional magazines of the day;  A Clarke story from Amateur Science Stories, a UK fanzine, won the Retro Hugo for 1939), but it certainly includes the vast majority.

Some of these works are available in various anthologies such as Asimov’s Great SF Stories 2: 1940 and Decade: The 1940s edited by Aldiss and Harrison (both of which can be purchased via ABE.com and possibly other online used book sellers).

There are 207 individual authors, writing approximately 631 individual stories.

Last NameFirst NameNumber of EntriesPseudonym(s)
AckermannHenry Andrew2
ArthurRobert3
ArthurJames1
AsimovIsaac7
BarnesArthur K.5Kelvin Kent
BatesHarry2
Bedford-JonesH.4Gordon Keyne
BernalArthur William1
BernsteinAlbert1Donald Bern
BerrymanJohn1
BesterAlfred1
BinderOtto24Eando Binder
Gordon A. Giles
John Coleridge
BinderEarl6John Coleridge
BinderJack3
BishopZealia1Z. B. Bishop
BlishJames2
BlochRobert4
BondNelson S.21George Danzell
Bour Jr.Laurence2
BousfieldH. T. W.1
BowmanGerald1
BrackettLeigh3
Breuer M.D.Miles J.1
BroomeJohn1
BrudyBill1
BurksArthur J.3Kelvin Kent
BurroughsJohn Coleman1
BurroughsHulbert1
CarsonSam1
ChadwickPaul1
ChapmanJohn L.2
ClancyRobert1
ClarkGeorge E.1
CoblentzStanton A.1
ConoverWillis1
CookeDavid C.1
CounselmanMary Elizabeth1
CraigJohn C.1
CummingsRay14Ray KIng
de CampL. Sprague8
del ReyLester7Philip St. John
DerlethAugust2
DownieJ. Vale1
DrewDouglas1
DunnJ. Allan3
DyalhisNictzin1
EdwardsD. M.1
EshbachLloyd Arthur1
EvansGerald2
FarleyRalph Milne4
FarnsworthMona2
FearnJohn Russell25Thornton Ayre
Dennis Clive
Ephriam Winiki
Dom Passante
John Cotton
Polton Cross
FedorA.1
Fleming-RobertsG. T.1
FohnL. Joe1
FosterD. J.1
FriendOscar J.9Frank Johnson
FyfeH. B.2
GaleFloyd C.1
GallunRaymond Z.13Arthur Allport
GarfieldFrances1
GhensiF. B.1
GoldH. L.5
GrayRussell1
Gregory Jr.Jackson1
GrosserE. A.5
GruberFrank1
GuffinLewis A.1
HagerSudie Stuart1
HaggardJ. Harvey1
HallFrances1
HamiltonEdmond19Robert O. Wentworth
HardartF. E.1
HargreavesDon1
HarrisonKenneth L.1
HarryJohn E.1
HasseHenry2
HastingsCristel1
HauserF. H.1
HawkinsWillard2
HawkinsWard1
HeinleinRobert A.8Lyle Monroe
HerbertBenson1
HubbardL. Ron14Kurt von Rachen
Frederick Engelhardt
René Lafayette
HurleyEdith1
IrvineClyde1
JacobiCarl1
JamesD. L.3Daniel Lewis James
JamesonMalcolm10
JonesNeil R.5
KaletskyMilton6
KelleamJoseph E.1
Keller M.D.David H.4
KelleyThomas P.4
KenealyNicholas E.1
KennedyLiam1
KhayyamOmar1
KlineOtis Adelbert1
KnightNorman L.4
KornbluthC. M.5Gabriel Barclay
S. D. Gottesman
KostkosHenry J.1
KramerEdgar Daniel1
KrulfeldMyer2
Kummer Jr.Frederic Arnold15
KuttnerHenry20Kelvin Kent
Paul Edmonds
Noel Gardner
Paul Edmonds
Peter Horn
LeiberFritz2
LeitfredRobert H.1
LeonardClive1
LewisRichard O.5
LeyWilly2Robert Willey
LongFrank Belknap6
LongAmelia Reynolds2
LovecraftH. P.2Z. B. Bishop
LowndesRobert A. W.1Paul Dennis Lavond
MackintoshCharles Henry1
ManningLaurence1
MarksWinston K.1
McClaryThomas Calvert2
McCluskyThorp1
McGivernWilliam P.2
Merwin Jr.Sam1
MihalakisUlysses George1Silaki Ali Hassan
MillerP. Schuyler5
MooreC. L.2
MoravskyMaria1
NelsonMaisie1
NormanJames2
NowlanPhilip Francis3
O’BrienDavid Wright8John York Cabot
O’HearnMarian4
OlsenBob4
OwenFrank1
PageNorvell W.1
PalmerRaymond A.3A. R. Steber
PeacockWilbur S.2
Peirce Jr.Earl1
PhillipsVic2
PhillipsA. M.1Alexander M. Phillips
PlimmerDenis1
PoeEdgar Allan1
PohlFrederik3S. D. Gottesman
PowellJep1
PragnellFestus1
PrattFletcher2
PriceE. Hoffmann3
QuickDorothy3
QuinnSeabury4
ReedDavid V.3Peter Horn
ReidVincent1
ReppEd Earl7Bradner Buckner
ReynoldsJohn Murray2
RiceJane1
RimelDuane W.1
RocklynneRoss12
RogowLee1Craig Ellis
RomansR. H.1
RossiWilliam A.1
RothmanMilton A.2Lee Gregor
RuedigerGretchen1
RussellEric Frank1
RyanJ. B.1
SaariOliver3
SandrofIvan1
SchachnerNat4
SelwynCarl4
ShakespeareWilliam1
SharpD. D.2
SheridanMax C.2
ShurtleffBertrand L.1
SiegGerald Chan1
SimakClifford D.4
SiviaHarry1
SloatEdwin K.1
SmithClark Ashton3
Smith Ph.DEdward E.1
SondereggerLeo1
StamperW. J.1
StanglandArthur G.1
StoneLeslie F.1
SturgeonTheodore6
TempleWilliam F.1
TofteArthur1
TookeAlfred I.1
TracyDon2
TremaineF. Orlin2
VaethMartin1
van VogtA. E.7
VincentHarl9
WaltonHarry5
WandreiHoward2
Warner Jr.Harry1
WeinbaumStanley G.1
WeinbaumHelen3
WellmanManly Wade16
WellsHal K.2
WellsBasil1
WestJack2
WestonSam1
WilcoxDon10Miles Shelton
WilliamsRobert Moore14Russell Storm
WilliamsRalph1
WilliamsonJack9Nils O. Sonderlund
WilsonRichard1
WinterbothamR. R.4
WollheimDonald A.4Robert W. Lowndes
Unknown Author1 Edwin Benson
Unknown Author1 Will Garth

 

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