Special Report: Science Fiction Publishing and Art in Italy

This Amazing Stories special report interviews several science fiction artist working at Edizioni Della Vigna (Vineyard Publishing). Included are responses to questions from Alessandro Bani, Alexa Cesaroni, and Guiseppe Festino. It’s richly sprinkled with dozens of images that will simply AMAZE you.

A young Philip K Dick

No. 20 – Philip K Dick – “Where’s My Head?”

Angst is a modern condition that few of us can escape. How many people, I wonder, wake up each day and ask themselves: “How did I get into this situation?  How can I fix my life? What can I do to straighten out my life?”  Philip K Dick had other questions: “Am I mad? Why […]

Cherryh Portrait A

No. 18 – C.J. Cherryh, The Faded Sun, and a World Building Ethos.

No. 18 – 2013Jun02 – C.J. Cherryh, The Faded Sun, and a World Building Ethos. The next time you look into the night sky, try finding the asteroid, 77185 Cherryh. Admittedly, it’s not an easy task. But it’s up there and named after Carolyn Janice Cherry, aka C.J. Cherryh. The discoverers believed Cherryh had “… […]

Bradbury Amazing Portrait - Jeff Durham illustration

No. 17 – Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451, and Book Burning.

No. 17 – 2013May26 – Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451, and Book Burning. Ray Bradbury would have you believe that he only wrote a single science fiction story. The rest, he claims, are actually fantasy yarns. That story was the first book of his that I ever read. It was an assignment for a high school […]

Arthur Charles Clarke - Pencil drawing

No.15 – Arthur Charles Clarke, A Space Odyssey, and Childhood’s End

No. 15– 2013May05– Arthur Charles Clarke, A Space Odyssey, and Childhood’s End   I met Arthur Charles Clarke once when he spoke at my university. He was ebullient and seemed to relish the attention from young academics seduced by the promise of technology. Occasionally, his face would cloud over when a particularly inept gushing of […]

No. 13 – The Number Thirteen, Black Magic, Mysticism, Swordplay and Sorcery

Number 13: a 13th Amazing Stories post. I interrupt my regularly scheduled posts, in my ongoing series of discussing writers of classic science fiction (and the inner meanings therein), to consider the number 13 (and its inner meanings therein). A full quarter of the year has passed and it seems some kind of celebratory diversion […]

No. 10 Robert Heinlein, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, and Self-Reliance

No. 10 – 2013Mar10 – Robert Heinlein, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, and Self-Reliance. As a Navy man, Heinlein recruited Isaac Asimov and L. Sprague de Camp into working at the Philadelphia Navy Shipyard. Like Asimov, Heinlein worked with Astounding Science Fiction magazine editor John W. Campbell, Jr. After selling Life-Line (1940 to Campbell), […]

Frankenstein 1931 - Boris Karloff - Director James Whale

No. 9: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, and Who’s The Real Monster?

Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley, while on holiday, visited Lord Byron’s Villa Diodati near Lake Geneva in 1816. Percy Shelley, her lover and future husband, and two close friends entertained Lord Byron, over several days, with discussions about galvanic responses, reanimation, and vivisection. After a lucid dream, she meditated upon these ideas and so inspired, began […]

Isaac Asimov in B & W drawing

No.8 Isaac Asimov, Psychohistory, Robot Crimes, and Positronic Brains.

2013Feb24 Isaac Asimov, Psychohistory, Robot Crimes, and Positronic Brains.  Isaac Asimov, aka: Isaak Yudovich Ozimov, aka: Исаак Юдович Озимов, is another member of the Big Four of the Golden Age of Science Fiction. Isaac Asimov drawing In a sense, I think of Asimov as the Grandmaster of Science in Science Fiction. He has the science […]

No. 6 – Theodore Sturgeon, The Next Question, Well-Meaning Scientists and The Evil They Can Cause.

2013 Feb 10 – Theodore Sturgeon, aka/Edward Hamilton Waldo, is best remembered for asking “What’s the next question?” In some portraits, you’ll see Sturgeon wearing a “Q,” with an arrow pointing forward, suspended from a thin, silver chain around his neck. He believed in questioning our assumptions. He would push further inquiry by suggesting that […]

No. 3 – Jules Verne, From The Earth To The Moon, and Space Opera.

Jules Verne hovers between number two and number three on the list of the most translated books worldwide and I think it’s deserved. He became one of the earliest science fiction writers to make it financially from book sales. He is frequently referred to as the “Father of Science Fiction,” a distinction he shares with H. […]

No. 2 – Edgar Rice Burroughs, John Carter of Mars

Any SF library without Edgar Rice Burroughs and John Carter of Mars is hardly complete. Burroughs’ John Carter series captured the imagination of many noted SF writers, like Ray Bradbury, early in their youth. As a teenager, I noted that Burroughs works were a multimedia experience with mass-marketing appeal: comic books, comic strips, novels, and […]

No. 1 – Philip Francis Nowlan, Buck Rogers, and Military SF.

I’m both stunned and excited by the comeback of Amazing Stories and that I have become a part of this historic process. And it is a historic process. I’ve been looking back at what Amazing Stories’ accomplished in the past and it just increases my anticipation. With a history of so many great writers and […]