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Doris V. Sutherland

Amazing Histories, Summer 1928: The Third Quarter

The editors realize that, this being your publication, you, the reader, have certain ideas, not only about this publication, but about scientifiction as well.

Amazing Histories, August 1928: Space Opera Takes Off

Amazing Stories' most collectible issue, featuring the birth of Space Opera and the origin of Anthony 'Buck' Rogers.

Amazing Histories, July 1928: The World’s a Stage

Scientific investigations conducted at the Gernsback offices...and a report on the July, 1928 issue of the magazine

Amazing Histories, June 1928: Beyond the Visible

Gernsback experiences myth becoming reality; H.G. Wells, David H Keller, Baron Munchhhausen's adventures and more round out this 1928 issue of the magazine

Amazing Histories, Spring 1928: The Second Quarter

"We believe that America will in time, become known as the hotbed of scientifiction..." Hugo Gernsback, 1928

Amazing Histories, May 1928: Inventions and Invertebrates

A cautionary editorial about predicting the future of technology; giant octopi in print, presaging giant creature films, and more

Amazing Histories, April 1928: The Second Anniversary

Clair Winger Harris, HG Wells, Gernsback, and an appeal to design a symbol for "Scientifiction"

Amazing Histories, March 1928: Sun and Moon

Doris Sutherland continues her review of Amazing Stories' early history. including letter column praise for H.P. Lovecraft's The Colour Out of Space.

Amazing Histories, Winter 1928: The First Quarter

Gernsback introduced Amazing Stories Quarterly when readers begged him to take the magazine weekly. Here's the first issue.

Amazing Histories, February 1928: Rewriting History, Rethinking Physics

Baron Munchausen begins his adventures anew in the latest issue of Amazing Stories

Amazing Histories, January 1928: Comets and Catastrophes

"I have tried to get several of my friends to read your magazine by lending out old copies of mine; when their parents find these copies they refuse to let them even finish the stories"

Amazing Histories, December 1927: In the Sky, Under the Sea and...

No, tthat's not a futuristtic opium den on the cover, though the editorial content does dabble in psychology.

Amazing Histories, November 1927: Humanity Past and Future

Journey back to November 1927, when Hugo Gernsback suggests that some science fiction concepts may become obsolete.

Amazing Histories, October 1927: Prehistoric Life and Futuristic Crimes

Two people stand inside an observatory, staring up at the sky. They have access to a large telescope, but they are not looking through...

Amazing Histories, September 1927: From a Darker Place

extraterrestrial diseases, chemically-created spectres, man-eating plants, electric deathtraps and people being turned to stone...and it's ONLY 1927....

Amazing Histories, August 1927: Red Mars and Darkest Africa

The debut of H. G. Wells' The War of the Worlds, and an iconic Frank R. Paul cover.

Amazing Histories, July 1927: An Annual Event

Two-fer, as Doris dives deep into both the July 1927 issue and the one and only Amazing Stories Annual.

Amazing Histories, June 1927: Prize-Winning Stories

In this latest issue, Hugo Gernsback announces that he and his associates have chosen the three contest winners from around 360 entrants

Amazing Histories, May 1927: Long Journeys and Short Trips

From Gernsback's editorial: “The editors of Amazing Stories… are trying their best to keep from this magazine stories that belong rather in the domain of fairy tales than in scientifiction”,

Amazing Histories, April 1927: The First Anniversary

Amazing Stories' first anniversary issue hits the stands.

Amazing Histories, March 1927: Hidden Worlds

Amazing Stories gives up its use of Amazing Stories Bulky Weave paper, Gernsback laments not being able to please 100% of his readers and some of them complain, just a bit, in the letter column.

Amazing Histories, February 1927: New Worlds and Human Failings

Time to activate the way-back machine once more as we journey to February 1927 and the latest issue of Amazing Stories!
The Devil-Doll

A. Merritt on Film: Burn, Witch, Burn!

Tod Browning's adaptation of A Merritt's Burn, Witch Burn! was less faithful to the source material than a Mexican film based on the same material, but was technically a much better film.
Seven Footprints to Satan.

A. Merritt on Film: Seven Footprints to Satan

Taken as a spiritual successor to The Cat and the Canary, Seven Footprints to Satan is not too bad. That said, it is a shame that First National missed the chance to give filmgoers a full-blooded A. Merritt adaptation.

Amazing Histories, January 1927: Start of a New Year

The first issue of Amazing Stories for 1927 features writing by, among others, Murray Leinster and H. G. Wells, as well as the magazine's first...letters column!

Amazing Histories, December 1926: Moon-Men and Murders

Amazing Stories closes out its first year of publication with excerpts from novels by H. G. Wells and Garrett O. Serviss, and much, much more.

Amazing Histories, November 1926: Apocalyptic Visions

The November 1926 issue of Amazing Stories contained a lot of dark stories, including the conclusion of the serialization of H. G. Wells' The Island of Doctor Moreau.

Amazing Histories, October 1926: Pole to Pole

It's back to October 1926...

Amazing Histories, September 1926: Novel Matters

the sixth issue of Amazing Stories focuses on novel excerpts rather than short stories, but what novel excerpts they are!

Amazing Histories, August 1926: The Mind Electric

A recurring theme in Amazing Stories #5 is the alteration of the human mind.